The impact of the minor characters in the novel invisible man by ralph ellison

At the end of the novel, he lives in a manhole underground. The first and last chapters take place in the present and frame the past incidents that make up the body of the story. For the central part of the novel, he is a young man, a college student, and an orator in a Communist group known as the Brotherhood. He is evidently a charismatic speaker and an uncompromisingly introspective thinker.

The impact of the minor characters in the novel invisible man by ralph ellison

Many are simply ordinary, everyday people living ordinary, everyday lives. Because their significance depends solely on how the narrator chooses to see them, none can be clearly designated as major or minor characters.

Following are brief descriptions of the key characters, listed in order of their appearance in the novel. The South Greenwood, South Carolina The narrator the "Invisible Man" A misguided, mis-educated young man whose quest for meaning and identity as a black man in white America leads him into numerous dangerous situations.

Although he undoubtedly has a name, he remains nameless and "invisible" throughout the novel. The school superintendent The nameless white man who invites the narrator to give his high school graduation speech at the smoker, where he acts as master of ceremonies. After tricking him into participating in the battle royal, he rewards him with a calfskin briefcase and "a scholarship to the state college for Negroes.

Tatlock The largest of the ten black boys forced to participate in the battle royal. Tatlock and the narrator are final contestants in the bloody boxing match, which results in a temporary deadlock.

Norton A white Northern liberal and multi-millionaire who provides financial support for Dr. A "smoker of cigars [and] teller of polite Negro stories," Mr.

Ralph Ellison

Norton is a covert racist who hides his true feelings behind a mask of philanthropy. The Founder Modeled after Booker T.

Although he does not appear in the novel, the Founder like the grandfather exerts a powerful influence on the narrator. Bledsoe is the president of the black college established by the Founder. Bledsoe destroys the dream to promote his own selfish interests.

Jim Trueblood Although readers may tend to think of him primarily as the sharecropper who has sex with his teenage daughter, Jim Trueblood is the only true "brother" "blood" in the novel: He accepts full responsibility for his behavior, makes peace with his God, and fights for himself, his family, and his land.

The impact of the minor characters in the novel invisible man by ralph ellison

Norton, is a racist who hides behind a mask of philanthropy. The vet One of the shellshocked veterans at the Golden Day tavern. Because of his candid speech, his brutal honesty, and his refusal to act subservient toward whites, he is considered dangerous and hastily transferred to St.

The veterans hate him because he represents the white power structure. Big Halley The bartender at the Golden Day. Although Supercargo is officially charged with keeping order at the Golden Day, it is Big Halley who ultimately maintains control. He has his finger on the pulse of the black community.

Burnside and Sylvester Veterans at the Golden Day. Burnside is a former doctor. Sylvester leads the vicious attack on Supercargo.

Edna harbors sexual fantasies about white men and playfully propositions Mr. Crenshaw The attendant who accompanies the vet to St. The North Harlem and Manhattan, New York Ras the Exhorter later Ras the Destroyer Modeled after renowned black leader Marcus Garvey, Ras is a powerful orator and black nationalist leader who believes that integration with whites is impossible.

He is violently opposed to the Brotherhood.Ralph Ellison's single published novel, Invisible Man, is recognized as one of the finest achievements in modern American fiction as well as one of the most complete statements of .

In his novel, Invisible Man, Ralph Ellison uses the main characters to affect the narrator’s invisibility. The highly ranked white people from the hotel ballroom affected the narrator’s invisibility by humiliation, embarrassment, and publicly degrading him.

Published by Ralph Ellison in to instantaneous acclaim, Invisible Man is the story of a man in New York City who, after his experiences growing up and living as a model black citizen, now lives in an underground hole and believes he is invisible to American society.

CHARACTER LIST Major Characters.

The impact of the minor characters in the novel invisible man by ralph ellison

The Narrator In the Prologue and the Epilogue, he is the Invisible Man. For the central part of the novel, he is a young man, a college student, and an orator in a Communist group known as the Brotherhood.

He is evidently a charismatic speaker and an uncompromisingly introspective thinker. Invisible Man is the story of a young, college-educated black man struggling to survive and succeed in a racially divided society that refuses to see him as a human being.

Invisible Man - Wikipedia

Told in the form of a first-person narrative, Invisible Man traces the nameless narrator's physical and psychological journey. Invisible Man is a novel by Ralph Ellison, published by Random House in It addresses many of the social and intellectual issues facing African Americans early in the twentieth century, including black nationalism, the relationship between black identity and Marxism, and the reformist racial policies of Booker T.

Washington, as well as issues of individuality and personal identity.

Invisible Man by Ralph Ellison